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, california and eventually goes to his home, which they have a right to do and the meanings are these wonderful people who adopted three children were their parents were killed in marvelous human beans. the nurse goes into bob sura and points to the blonde says i'd share the tnr? dnr means do not resuscitate. party of medics keeping you alive when you have a medical emergency? is that asking him to die? is nurse, his doctor, all the people to solve the nurse to this under other actions were just appalled by this. well, warren buffett did know about this and wouldn't approve in the race. on the other hand, what does mr. buffett said so long as my managers the numbers as they see fit. it's indicative of the callousness going on, where we don't have that one or so focus on profit you could have a company go and say please die. >> host: but when we talked in your book about some of these industries being deregulated and certain the presidential campaign they talk about regulation in terms of democrats versus republican issues. but for more of these flaws, more of the problems cr
regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
as the great plains, the rocky mountains and then west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california because california has you know was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. now, southerners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, in the famous or infamous dred scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed this southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast said never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow moral -- no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territories. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of a dividing line western beyond the louisiana purchase all
and southern california and arizona and north carolina are informed in the post-world war two period by this historic shift in population and political influence and it is pogo from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson, nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. jimmy carter, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas, bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas since 2008 is a watershed election. there were critical of the politics that the flood that came out of the sun belt. they tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense of an opposition to the union and the defense of the free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and the southwest that we see the rise by the 1970's to talk about is the religious right's involved in the political process in the new and important ways. so he was at the forefron
-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from the state on the sun belt. when johnson from texas, richard nixon from california. gerald ford was never elected, so he doesn't count. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california. the first george bush via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second question texas. so too does the natives and so ways a watershed election. it ends the 40 year. the sun belt dominance. their issues critical in the politics that developed that came out of the sun belt. they didn't have a conservative cast of them. they tended to be oriented about issues of strong national defense, and opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also is in the south and sou
mountains and west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california. because california, as you know, was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. own by the entire nation inspect 1857, the dread scott decision. the united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast csh no matter the supreme court republicans would allow slaves in any territory. lincoln was elected in november of 1860, a month later the united states congress came in to session, members of congress put forth various comprises, a critical portion of all in some deal with the division of the territory. most often there was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line west ward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. i'm going get to my main topic. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise, which meant the territories. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them, all of you know his name. abraham linco
to missouri and texas to california. she helped out banks when times were bad and they were in trouble. she was the largest individual lender to the new york city government. she lived in the gilded age when society lived lavishly and she rebelled against their opulence. she lived a simple life. she loved her children and her friends. she was of those who befriended her for her money and she showed her dog great affection and when asked why, she said -- [inaudible] [laughter] she forged a path for women to be able to have careers. she showed that women were the equal of any man. newspapers around the world, they proclaimed her the queen of wall street. it was known throughout that she was the richest woman in america. so there are lots of sayings in the back of the book and words of wisdom. she did have a good sense of humor and she was one smart lady. if you have any questions, i would love to try and answer. >> would you find any evidence of her support? >> nine. she said women should not have the right to vote. margaret thatcher did leave and not either. vera can't even believe in it. it
generations. as governor he compete with other states for jobs and subsidies are relatively easy. california -- [laughter] anybody from california? california, illinois, connecticut, thank you. but those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulations and so that's, you know, we are competing. but we do every day is to try and find companies out there that can't compete. i think about simply if you're a business come to think of yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name the time did the research yourself, i think i'll pay more for the project because i know that company is headquartered in a high tax state. or gosh, i know they have more regulations saw pay more for the product because i know cost the company more for more regulations or takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. so if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulation and faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude to our businesses will outcompete everybody and will get more jobs and that's what we're doing every day. in contrast, my biggest competitor is texas. texas has been doing the
settlement to take place in 1861. .. because california as you know is already a state. the question is critical because they tend to deal with of the slavery and southern power indonesian. some have demanded what they saw as the constitutional rights of american citizens to take their property in quoting the slave property into the territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857 in the infamous dr. scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitutional chief. republicans in contrast said never if. fifth republicans would allow in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later in the united states congress can intercession. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the division of territory. most often there was a proposal to extend a dividing line west of the beyond louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this process i'm going to get to my main topic why lincoln rejected the compromise which meant the territories. but their must be one t
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered if the recommendations you are making i understand that you are trying to bring together all these agencies across the executive branch whether they are of the legislative branch is a very much partner in this. how do your recommendations bring the congressional leaders and to coordinate with them as well as the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this would be institutionalized or created also legislativel
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
that will work well in your commies to mourn for the california when you are making baskets. .. always in the long run out perform a top down consensually planned system. this isn't inside from an austrian economist, a very important one, which is because the world is so complicated, because the economy is so competent, because the city is so complicated that is trying to understand it is too hard for a small group of china's centrally located planners to ever fully be able to do. and so the way the markets work as they say look, no individual person has to understand the whole thing. the market works because every individual in the market understands just a little bit of it. you can focus on your part buying and selling, creating, sharing. in your part of the world, and over all the totality of all these agents will end up coming up with new solutions to problems, meeting people's needs and so when. so markets are a kind of pure network in that sense. where the pure progressives differ from traditional libertarians is that we don't think that markets solve every problem in society.elf
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
-- [laughter] california -- anybody from california? illinois, connecticut -- thank goodness. [laughter] what those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulation, and so that's -- that's our, you know, we're competing and so what we do every day is find companies out there who can't compete. i think about it as this. if you're in business or think about yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name a time you said to yourself, you know, i'll pay more for that product because they are headquartered in the high tax state. [laughter] oh, gosh, they have more regulations, i'll pay more for that because it costs the company more because they have regulations or it takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulations, faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude, our businesses will out compete everybody. we'll get more competitive every day. our biggest competitor is texas. texas is doing the right thing. look at the last of the eight years, texas is the number one place to do business. when i first got legislated, i --
california, you're on with author kenneth davis. >> caller: good morning, mr. davis. mr. davis, you mentioned columbus discovering the new world, but i read that the vikings were it the first on the east coast. and before them came a navigator from ireland. do you have any historical the information on these two? >> guest: short. i address both of those questions in don't know much about geography. one is much more easily incident the other because certainly the vikings were here, when i say here, in north america close of 500 years before columbus arrived. the site of the viking village that they left behind has been excavated. it is now a unesco world heritage site up in newfoundland so that evidence is quite clear and overwhelming. the part of the story that connects to columbus, however, was always the idea that, perhaps, there was some way that columbus knew about the vikings having sailed here. there was even a map that later proved to be a fraud that was said to be something columbus had. there is no evidence to suggest that columbus knew about the vikings or their route to north ameri
proud that in california, our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators, senator feinstein and senator boxer. so women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our number are great, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator baldwin -- [applause] >> we are very proud of that. senator-elect -- [applause] only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. so that's pretty exciting. and, unfortunately, we won't have capital coal -- kathy local and betty sutton in this next congress, but the future is soon and coming upon us and we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. in the past week since the election were still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success or as i said yesterday, and as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states, of the house democratic women? because this is where hopes and dreams of america's families are rising. they may not know that. th
and it is a real problem. part of it is the state of california and how it's structured to take claims. but the insurance companies, you know, the point is the cost of workers compensation for our little league as they had to go through the state senate was about 1.5 times the entire compensation of the players and we had a conversation recently with the national football league and i think if you asked them, they would tell you it's a similar program. why is a problem? they think of inheriting a word player played last, the whole thing and nobody objects of course because there are players that have been hurt. if you go back and say you want change this, you and up were dr. cantu is talking about. and then i say wow, we basically have an entire generation we have to deal with because who knows somebody in the southeast conference has perhaps already occurred tmh that isn't going to manifest itself in 15 or 20 years. >> i think you were telling me that the last team that employs the player is the one that picks up all the workers comp. >> and that's not right or wrong. it happens to be
in a place in california. i actually worked on another story about the bohemian grove so i know the place well. >> host: a men's club? >> guest: all men, 2,000 men together at a summer camp, and they do it every year as there was a bohemian club in san fransisco hosting this con fab of corporate decision makers, government luminaries, diplomats, very, very important people, probably the equivalent today of, you know, some of the big events that happen in aspen, and out, you know, when you see folks in shirt sleeves rubbing elbows with each other. jackson, actually, was coming out in august of that year, 195 #, to -- 1952, to do that. his professor said, first, he asked jackson, there was a ground breaking of the law school, will you speak? jackson agreed. then the professor surprised rehnquist saying i'm going to arrange for you to meet him. the interesting thing is that rehnquist did meet him, and method with jackson, and jackson just kind of didn't even interview him. rehnquist had a swedish an sees rights movement, -- ancestry, which he talked about always, and so jackson got off on a
coastal town in california. he was the subject, on the fbi most wanted list and responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pak
to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home, in name pa valley -- napa valley, was broken into on monday. so she actually has some literal housekeeping to take care of. they don't know what is missing and sort of this bizarre thing. now, in the event that she does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the sort of subtext, it's almost a shakespearian subtext between hoyer and pelosi. they interned together on capitol hill in the 1960s, and they've been rivals for years, most poignantly in the last 10, 12 years as they competed for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader, and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is maneuvering, is trying to line up somebody who would be her successor of chose. so there's a lot of drama. >> and just rattle off, if you would, who is in that next generation of would-be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement, or even if they don't, would like to move up? >> the -- right now outside of hoye
. on marriage they were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 50% voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative and we also have to understand that there's a big difference between the old latino community of some 20 or 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez latino community, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago and those in the southwest since the u.s. basically took half of mexico and the new population which is 40% foreign-born and the rest of the children of immigrants come a very conservative i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary that we get caught up in the polls we've seen it in this election cycle and besides pulling them with specific issues if we had a better understanding of what they are coming from you would get an understanding of why they are answering the question, but i believe with the latino community we lost the vote because of immigration. if we would have had a better position on immigration from the get go come from the primary government romney would have been competitive in those battle
's called california. it's called maryland coming and i don't see any reason why we don't wait two years to see whether how california is doing with their new higher marginal tax rates on folks and sales taxes on middle-income people as well and sales taxes and maryland raising the tax on guys that made a million come to madrid 50, and they are down to under 50 tax in maryland because they can't leave. they make a million dollars and they can walk across the border. so, we are seeing some very -- people are testing obama's peery in the state and i think we should do it on a small state like vermont at first and see how it works. whereas texas and florida are giving an idea of how you can govern without an income tax. people moved. we kind of know what is going to happen here. indiana, illinois, big border. they just past the right to work and they're giving the school kids a choice of a falter scholarship. illinois raised taxes want to inform the government worker pension system. who is going to build a factory in the 100 miles on the western side of the border? any takers for the people
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
from california, for five minutes to thank you, very much, mr. chairman. i want to thank you for holding this hearing and working with the democrats to make this a bipartisan hearing. we are talking about this ongoing health tragedy. an untold number of vials of steroids were contaminated. they have sold all -- they have so far killed 32 people. it has brought unspeakable devastation to so many families. that is why i am grateful for it joyce lovelace to be here. it takes a great deal of courage to come forward. let's not lose sight of the wrongdoer. the regulators deserve blame. the primary blame is the company. we have theubpoena, the former president necc, barry cadden, we asked him to testify about how this company handled the matter. what we learned is that even 10 years ago, people who were regulating the company indicated that they had sloppy practices. in many years ago they indicated that they could have can have a meningitis outbreak. it wasn't corrected by the company. and the company went about its ways, telling people that they were going to behave better. they
. i met a woman in california who was adopted in her 40's because she was reunited with a woman who used to care for her, she grew up in foster care, became successful but when they were reunited they still loved each other the same way they had done 40 years earlier and decided to be a family. it's quite a miracle of loving and bonding that happens through adoption. frank and i, my lus and i are so proud to be the parents of two extraordinary chirp who happen to be adopted. we've built our family through adoption. my husband was, in fact, adopted out of an orphanage from ireland when he was 5 years old and still remembers the day when the may tron of this little brought assistant home for children came up and walked up to him and said ernest, pack your bags, your mom and dad are here to take you home. he saw his mother and father, adoptive mother and daughter father, brother and sister, and the rest is history, came to america and received an excellent education, has gone on to be a wonderful, wonderful citizen, of course, a great father and loving husband. so grateful for that opp
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
to regulate the means of production of our agriculture products. a state like california might be fine that has defined a is coming to california shall be raised by hansen student cage size. start out being free range. nancy pelosi impose free range hens from exum re- -- in the captors in the building is remember. that california agenda violates the commerce clause of the constitution that where interstate commerce is regulate exclusively by congress, not the state. and our founding fathers understood but it needs to be stuck. i did put an amendment on the farm bill called the pike and mimic to protect interstate commerce an amendment which prohibits the states from regulating the means of production of our act product but there's a list that exists in the code. so that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that somethi
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. again, we have to look at money in politics. as i say what was then and in effect of a change of opinion. >> this is very interesting. comments from offers speakers that i want to ask at a demographic group none of you touched on this site because distant name i heard of demography being impactful in america. one out of every five americans has a disability and 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. yet, at the national press club when there was an opportunity or, as you know, the past president of the press club for the romney campaign and the obama can antisense him to some to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign showed not to attend or issue a position paper on disabilities. so i wanted to ask, why given that one out of every five americans has the disability, 51% of american voters has a family or with a disability. why isn't there more of a conversation about that demographic withi
resulted in these personnel actions. >> thank you. yield back. >> the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i find this hearing amazing. because what we need to do is to work together to solve a problem. and make sure it will never happen again. instead, what i hear from my republican colleagues is they want to prosecute the director of the food and drug administration. did she know this? what actions did she take? it sounds like massachusetts has a lot to be apologetic about. isn't that a fair statement, dr. smith? >> that's right. >> the question is, did fda failed to do things they should have done? well, sounds like you could have done more. the fda is an institution could do more. the first time they wrote a letter wasn't 2006, saying that this thing seemed to become this company seem to be out of control. and then they didn't do anything after that. i have a feeling, dr. hamburg, you are being picked on because you're part of the obama administration, and republicans have been picking on obama for four years. and usually thei
in a highly competitive and highly mobile labor pool, alabama and california and texas and vermont have some sense that their kids have a common basis of knowledge. so since they came up with the national governors association, i would hope that we could have more discussion. >> i agree. michael gold is really doing a lot of work in the united kingdom. he got all excited. in the k-12 system, it goes to the heart of it. there is this deep belief that we need to develop acute self-esteem so we can perform. we need to do is tell people we need to do that to have self-esteem. because we get that right, that will be great. they are not easy to achieve, but if i could wave a wand i would make k-12 teachers america's heroes. they would be the profession that we all aspire to, they would be places like japan where they call their teachers sensei and you can feel the difference between we view those in america and those in other countries. we have decided to unionize rather than professionalize. when you do that, but you end up with is creating this in k-12. a lot of people disagree. i think that cho
: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: i would ask that the quorum call be dispensed with, please. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. boxer: thank you so much, mr. president. just in the lull here and if there is any legislative business to take place, i will immediately give up the floor, but in this lull i just want to make a point. i am so proud to be in this senate, so proud to be here for a long time now, came here in 1993, there were two women, we went to six women, now we're going to 20 women and i've seen changes and i've seen good things and i've seen rough things. but i have to say one of the things that keeps coming up continually here is folks trying to use these debates on bills to add irrelevant amendments, amendments that have nothing to do with the topic at hand. i think we all agree that defending our nation is our number-one priority, and therefore having a defense authorization bill is very, very important. and i'm sure that we don't agree with every single sentence of this bill, but in general we all wa
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